Author Topic: Dark Souls Strategy  (Read 1225 times)

Ryan Baker

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Dark Souls Strategy
« on: March 03, 2015, 11:13:37 PM »
So people. Tell me everything you know / like / love / hate about Dark Souls.

Should I riposte, back-dash, or block and counter-attack? Pros, cons?

What do you like or not like about the elemental / damage type system?
« Last Edit: March 04, 2015, 10:16:25 PM by Ryan Baker »

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Doomspeaker

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Re: Dark Souls
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2015, 04:18:24 AM »
Told you about the ripostes in the othe thread yup.

As a beginner get a good shield and stick with it. After you memorized enemy movements, you can try out rolling (what you called dashing). Rolling is largely dependant on timing and the weight of your equiptment, so it limits what items you can use. I'm not sure if that all should be fully explained toyou yet, because finding out (or not in some cases) how things work in Dark Souls is part of the fun.

Dark Souls damage system sounds good on paper, but there's way to few points in the game where you will ever be able to take advantage of it. This is because they can't simply drop you into an area and suddenly have your main weapon be useless. That's a good lesson to learn from Dark Souls: Don't put large emphasis on elemental damage systems unless you canensure players can access it/won't randomly get screwed by it without them doing anything wrong.

Also note how certain damage types are lractically assigned to stats: blunt is common on stength weapons, piece is common on dexterity weapons, sorcery is based on intelligence and lightning is based on faith. By default each playstyle will have a strength and weakness "baked in", further contributing to unique playstyles.

If you want to take something away from Dark Souls for Ddrop, look at the slow methodic combat, how different weapons can influence the game despite not being all that different and how it's ok for characters to not be blazingly fast.


Quady14

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Re: Dark Souls
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2015, 03:42:01 PM »
I don't want to spoil the fun of discovery too much for you, so I won't get into really specific details, but I'll mention just a few things to start, otherwise I'll be typing for hours. XD

What I love about the Souls series, probably the most common thing we've discussed and part of what drew me into DDrop as well when the kickstarter was going was the rich world-building, I can't express how important that is and how much appreciation it garners from myself and many fans of the series, and going beyond general info about a world, the stories you can tell with characters, locations and even weapons and spells can lead to some great discoveries by the player.

I'll use an example from Dark Souls II: There's a boss in one of the DLCs who ties into the lore of the main game, and it just so happens that when you fight him, if you wear the helmet piece of his rival who is also present as a boss in the main game, he skips his initial fighting tactics dual-wielding two swords and turns his ultra greatsword into a flaming deathstick.

He does this anyways partway through the fight, but the intention is that his reaction to seeing you donning the helmet of the man he held a bitter rivalry with enrages him (either because it means you defeated his rival and took the opportunity of revenge from him, or just because the reminder angers him in general for what he lost over it) and makes him take you on at full intensity from the very beginning of the fight.

That's not a super common thing in the series, but I love that the lore so directly impacts the gameplay in that instance. There's a lot of great examples of storytelling throughout the entire series, and that's just one of many favorites of mine.

Dark Souls itself has a small variant on the intro cutscene of a boss if you complete the Artorias of the Abyss DLC beforehand, it's such a tiny change, but it changes the context and the reason the boss is fighting you, and makes it all the more tragic.

I'll say no more though, play how you want this first time through, then maybe come back to it at some point. I know your time is limited, but each entry in the Souls series really does lend well to repeated playthroughs. Also note that your first playthrough will probably take the longest, so return trips will feel smoother since you'll be familiar with the mechanics at that point.

If you do want to find more straight-up lore once you've played through the game, I recommend EpicNameBro's older videos, as he used to do some really good stuff on DkS1. VaatiVidya does a mix of DkS1, DkSII and Bloodborne lore videos which are quite nicely done and develop some narratives which may initially seem vague into really robust stories about different figures within the world.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2015, 03:50:03 PM by Quady14 »
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Doomspeaker

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Re: Dark Souls
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2015, 03:42:46 AM »
I'll use an example from Dark Souls II: There's a boss in one of the DLCs who ties into the lore of the main game, and it just so happens that when you fight him, if you wear the helmet piece of his rival who is also present as a boss in the main game, he skips his initial fighting tactics dual-wielding two swords and turns his ultra greatsword into a flaming deathstick.

Yes, yes, yes. If you can find a way to add some small touches like this, players will rave about it. Even tiny bits can be enough to motivate people to replay a game, just to see what could happen. And as given by Quady's example, it doesn't even need to be any extra content and slight modifications easily do the trick.

 

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